Professor: Raymond A. Eve, Ph.D.

Office: 442 UH

Hours: 3:30 – 4:30 MW, and by appointment

Phone: 817-272-3764 (office)

or 817-272-2661 (Sociology office)

email: eve@uta.edu

 

 

 

Riots, Fads, Cults, and Social Movements

Sociology 3323.001

Fall, 2010

MW 2:30 - 3:50 p.m.

UH008

Course websitehttp://www.global-college.com/rayeve/courses/riots/

I. Text:

        a) Miller, David L. Introduction to Collective Behavior

           and Collective Action. (2nd ed.). Prospect Heights,

           IL.: Waveland Press. 2000.

 

        b) There are a few online readings (pdf format) that will

           also be required.  See reading list for details.

II. Course Description:

The course will investigate human behavior that is generated or shaped by the influence of the collectivity to which individuals respond. The elementary forms of collective behavior include riots, panics, fads, crazes, and so forth. The complex forms of social behavior are usually defined as social movements -- such as environmentalism ("The Greens"), the religious right, gay rights, revolutions, political campaigns, and so forth.  This latter category is covered in a separate course (Soci 3324).  The elementary forms of collective behavior can be characterized as relatively spontaneous, unstructured behaviors.  As such, it has collective behavior has sometimes been called "society in becoming."   It is often the way that change enters society. Collective behavior often appears wild and spontaneous, but such behavior is nonetheless predictable to a degree.  However, the rules for such behavior are not the rules that govern individual behavior. Thus, we tend to view such behavior as chaotic or mystical when, in fact, it is reasonably regular. Concepts to be examined in light of actual past or present episodes of collective behavior include: epidemic hysteria, the emergence of normative behavior, the use of symbols (Swastikas, for example, or crosses), public opinion, fads and fashion, and riot generation and control.  Indeed there are many other forms of collective behavior as well and we will examine wide variety of these.

 

III. Attendance

Students attending regularly and otherwise showing motivation will receive more consideration in grading than will those attending seldom.

IMPORTANT: NOTE THAT ARRIVING AT AN EXAM MORE THAN 10 MINUTES LATE WILL REQUIRE THE STUDENT TO SCHEDULE A MAKEUP EXAM AND PRODUCE A VALID REASON FOR MISSING/BEING LATE TO THE EXAM!

IV. Grading Practices:

Your grade will be based on three non-comprehensive exams (counting 33.3% each) and/or an optional term paper. (If you choose to do the optional term paper, the three exams and the term paper will each count 25% of your grade).

Reasons for excuses from exams must be very serious and should be checked in advance with the Professor. (Written medical excuses will be accepted).

Important dates:

Exam 1 = 33.3%, October 4th

Last day to drop a course = November 5th

Exam 2 = 33.3% November 8th

Thanksgiving Break = November 25th – 28th

OPTIONAL: Term Paper = November 30th (Due Date)

Final Exam = 33.3% Monday, Dec. 13th (2-4:30)

Important!!! Any assignments which are turned in late will have their scores reduced by 5% each day they are late unless the student has shown serious reasons (preferably in advance) to the Professor for the delay.  Students are required to keep a paper or e-copy backup of any work submitted during the semester.

VI. Disabilities:

If you require an accommodation based on disability, I would like to meet with you in the privacy of my office, during the first week of the semester, to make sure you are appropriately accommodated.

VII. Drops from the Roll:

The Professor will not automatically drop any student from the roll. Students wishing to drop must make their own arrangements to do so.


VIII. Academic Honesty:

Students are expected to conform to the university’s policy on academic honesty. That policy is clearly stated in both the undergraduate and graduate catalogs and should be reviewed by each student.

IX. Student Success Programs

The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success.  They include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs.  Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at 817-272-6107 for more information and appropriate referrals.